For Freshmen and Sophomores

NEW SOPHOMORE SEMINAR TO BE OFFERED IN FALL 2017!

PSYC 193, Perspectives in Asian American Psychology

Fall 2017, Friday 9.25-11.15
Instructor: June Chu
Course Description:
This course is intended to provide knowledge of Asian American personality, identity, and mental health and the cultural and societal influences that shape personality and mental health, analyze psychosocial research pertinent to Asian Americans, and develop critical thinking skills on Asian American issues. 

Expanded Description:
By and large, research in the field of psychology is based upon the assumption of one normative path of development. This normative path has historically based upon a view of psychological well being that is homogenous and historically Eurocentric. Asian Pacific Islander Americans remain the fastest growing racial group in the United States.  A generation of researchers in Asian American psychology has identified variables that are pertinent in the psychological adjustment of non-White groups, beginning with the work examining dimensions of collectivism and individualism.  Going beyond merely examining these two dimensions, others have begun to look at the specific variables in Asian American development that are important to psychological health. Topics of discussion will examine Asian American personality; family; the impact of culture on gender; violence; psychopathology; mental health treatment/care.– 


FAQ’s for Freshmen and Sophomores

  • How would I decide whether to major in Psychology?

    • You should first know what Psychology is about! Psychology is a broad field with many sub-disciplines. Although the word psychology may first bring to mind topics such as psychoanalysis and counseling, it is about much, much more than that. Just take a look at the courses offered within the department, and you will see a diverse range of topics, including “Attraction and Relationships”, “The Mental Lives of Babies and Animals”, and “The Criminal Mind”. The very best way to gain an understanding of the breadth of Psychology is to take Introduction in Psychology, which is offered every term. Note that although other 100-level courses are also accessible to freshmen and sophomores, they are significantly narrower in scope.
       

  • What should I take after Introduction to Psychology and when should I take each course?

    • Needless to say, it varies depending on students, but see the table below for a possible schedule for the standard track.

Course Name

Ideal time to complete

Notes

PreReq

Introductory Psychology
(or AP 5 credit)

Freshman

If you received a 5 in AP Psychology then you do not need to take this course.

1

Statistics
(PSYC 200 or STAT 103)

Sophomore

You can take this during Junior year, but some research methods courses have statistics as a pre-requisite. If you want to conduct empirical research for your senior requirement then you should plan on taking statistics as a Sophomore.

2

Research Methods
(PSYC 201-299)

Junior

3

Social Science – core
(PSYC 140, 150, or 180)

Sophomore

4

Social Science

Junior

5

Natural Science – core
(PSYC 120, 130, 160, 170, or 190)

Sophomore

6

Natural Science

Junior

7

PSYC elective

Freshman

Any 100-level course.

8

PSYC elective

Junior

This can be an independent research course. Check FAQ under “Research Experience”.

9

PSYC elective

Junior / Senior

10

PSYC elective

Senior

11

Senior requirement
(Psyc 400-499)

Senior

One (but only one) of these can be taken during your Junior year.

12

Senior requirement
(Psyc 400-499)

Senior

See the table below for the neuroscience track.

Course Name

Ideal time to complete

Notes

PreReq

Introductory Psychology
(or AP 5 credit)

Freshman

If you received a 5 in AP Psychology then you do not need to take this course.

PreReq

BIOL 101+102
(or AP 5 credit)

Freshman

If you received a 5 in AP Biology then you do not need to take this course.

PreReq

BIOL 103+104
(or AP 5 credit)

Sophomore

If you received a 5 in AP Biology then you do not need to take this course.

1

Statistics
(PSYC 200 or STAT 103)

Freshman / Sophomore

You can take this during Junior year, but some research methods courses have statistics as a pre-requisite. If you want to conduct empirical research for your senior requirement then you should plan on taking statistics as a Freshman or Sophomore.

2

Research Methods
(PSYC 201-299 w/ neuroscience focus)

Junior

3

Social Science – core
(PSYC 140, 150, or 180)

Sophomore

4

Social Science

Junior

5

Neuroscience – core
(PSYC 160 or 170)

Sophomore

6

Natural Science

Junior

7

PSYC elective

Freshman / Senior

Any PSYC course

8

PSYC elective

Junior

This can be an independent research course. Check FAQ under “Research Experience”.

9

Advanced science

Junior / Senior

10

Advanced science

Senior

11

Senior requirement
(Psyc 400-499)

Senior

One (but only one) of these can be taken during your Junior year.

12

Senior requirement
(Psyc 400-499)

Senior

  • As a Psychology major, can I get research experiences?

    • See under “Research Experience” in FAQ.
       

  • What can I do with a Psychology major when I graduate?

  • I am trying to decide between majoring in Psychology and Cognitive Science. What are the differences?

    • There are some similarities between Psychology and Cognitive Science majors. Both focus on questions related to how the mind works. However, the two majors have a different focus. Your best bet to learn more would be to look through the requirements of each program, and see which program best encompasses the set of courses you are hoping to take. You can also chat in person with the DUS for each major to hear more about the similarities and differences (For more information about Cognitive Science, click here.)
       

  • Where can I find information about the Neuroscience Track within the Psychology Major?

    • The neuroscience track is a special track within the Psychology Major for students who are interested in neuroscience. Such students are considered Psychology majors for whom the requirements have been modified to accommodate their interests, and to reflect the multidisciplinary nature of modern neuroscience and psychology. Interested students are encouraged to meet with the track adviser, Dr. Avram Holmes (avram.holmes@yale.edu). You should also take a look at the Neuroscience Track Major Worksheet which will give you a nice guide for how to fulfill all the Neuroscience Track requirements.

  • Where can I find information about Neuroscience Major? 

  • If I have questions that are not covered here, whom can I contact?

    • First check FAQ section. If your questions are still not covered there, contact DUS of Psychology; woo-kyoung.ahn@yale.edu.