Research Opportunities


SPECIAL NOTES:

All postings on this page will be removed and replaced with updated postings on August 10th, 2016. 

If you are a student looking for research opportunities, please revisit this page after August 10th.

If you are a researcher who wants to post an opening in your lab and have not yet listed your posting on our google doc, please contact Lauretta.Olivi@yale.edu


Researcher: Kathleen Oltman, Ph.D Student

Lab: Intergroup Relations Lab (Dr. John Dovidio)

Description: My work focuses on prejudice and discrimination; this particular project asks: How do aspects of our personal identity impact our perceptions of groups in society? In this project we will explore the individual factors that contribute to prejudice against certain minority groups in society.

Duties: Research assistants will contribute to all stages of the research process from recruitment, to data collection, to managing and analyzing data. Additionally, research assistants will engage in discussion of current projects and results, and may help with manuscript preparation and further research design (if necessary/desired).

Requirements: Previous research experience is preferred but not required. Assistants will be expected to have good “people skills” and be prompt communicators. This position is ideal for students with interests in social psychology, or graduate school in psychology generally.

Commitment: Approximately 5-10 hours per week; scheduling is flexible. Optional attendance of weekly lab meetings is encouraged.

Compensation: Volunteer or course credit (senior thesis possible).

Contact: Interested students should send a CV/resume, paragraph on why they are interested in the position, class year, major, and GPA to kathleen.oltman@yale.edu

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Researcher: Dr. BJ Casey, Professor of Psychology

Lab: The Yale Fundamentals of the Adolescent Brain (FAB) Lab 

Description: The Yale Fundamentals of the Adolescent Brain (FAB) Lab is seeking highly motivated Yale undergraduate students looking to gain research experience in behavioral and brain science. The lab uses behavioral, psychophysiological, genetic and neuroimaging techniques to study the development of self control and how it goes awry in substance abuse and psychiatric disorders. We are especially interested in self control during adolescence when these disorders emerge or peak in prevalence.

Duties: Research assistants will have the opportunity to contribute to many stages of the research process including recruitment, phone screening for participants, data collection (with children, adolescents, parents, and adult participants), preparing participants for the MRI scan, collecting biospecimens, managing and analyzing data, development of experiment-related materials, and discussion of current projects and results at our regular lab meetings.

Requirements: Previous research experience is preferred but not required. This position is ideal for students with interests in adolescent psychology, psychopathology and neuroscience.

Commitment: Approximately 10 hours per week; scheduling is flexible. Research assistants are encouraged to make a 2-semester commitment to the lab.

Compensation: Volunteer or course credit.

Contact: Interested students should send a CV/resume, paragraph on previous research experience (if any) and interest in the position, class year, major, and GPA to bj.casey@yale.edu.


Researchers: Drs. Kasia Chawarska, Suzanne Macari, Kelly Powell, & Scuddy Fontenelle

Lab: Yale Early Social Cognition Lab, Yale Child Study Center

Description: The Yale Early Social Cognition Lab (YESCog) is seeking undergraduates interested in learning about cutting-edge clinical and developmental research on social cognition in infants at risk for Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) as well as toddlers affected by developmental disabilities. Our research focuses on understanding the mechanisms that underlie social and emotional abnormalities during prodromal and early syndromic stages of ASD and improving early detection and diagnosis of ASD.

Duties: Responsibilities include assisting in a variety of research activities, including coding behavioral measures, assisting with eye-tracking and behavioral assessments, entering data, video recording assessments, and helping to facilitate family visits. Student assistants may participate in weekly lab meetings as well as bi-weekly Autism Science Meetings.

Hours: 6-10 hours per week. Scheduling is flexible.

Compensation: Volunteer or course credit.

Contact: If interested, please contact with your CV or resume: amy.margolis@yale.edu


Researcher: Dr. Dylan Gee, Assistant Professor of Psychology

Description: The Yale Clinical Affective Neuroscience & Development Lab is seeking highly motivated Yale undergraduate students looking to gain research experience in clinical psychology and developmental neuroscience. The lab uses behavioral, psychophysiological, and neuroimaging techniques to study the development of anxiety and stress-related disorders across childhood and adolescence. We are especially interested in typical and atypical trajectories of brain development related to emotional behavior, the effects of early-life adversity, and translating knowledge from basic science to optimize clinical treatments.

Duties: Research assistants will have the opportunity to contribute to many stages of the research process including recruitment, phone screening for clinical participants, data collection (with children, adolescents, parents, and adult participants), preparing participants for the MRI scan, managing and analyzing data, development of experiment-related materials, and discussion of current projects and results at our regular lab meetings.

Requirements: Previous research experience is preferred but not required. This position is ideal for students with interests in clinical child & adolescent psychology and neuroscience.

Commitment: Approximately 10 hours per week; scheduling is flexible. Research assistants are encouraged to make a 2-semester commitment to the lab.

Compensation: Volunteer or course credit.

Contact: Interested students should send a CV/resume, paragraph on previous research experience (if any) and interest in the position, class year, major, and GPA to dylan.gee@yale.edu.


Researchers:  Denis Sukhodolsky, Associate Professor. Megan Tudor, Postdoctoral fellow

Lab: The Sukhodolsky lab, Child Study Center, Yale School of Medicine

Description: The Sukhodolsky lab conduct research on the efficacy and biomarkers of behavioral interventions for children with neurodevelopmental disorders including autism, Tourette Syndrome and disruptive behavior disorders. The long-term goals of this research are to identify the neural mechanisms of behavioral interventions with established efficacy, such as habit reversal training for tics and cognitive-behavioral therapy for irritability, and to develop new, neuroscience-based treatments for children who do not respond to existing treatments.

Duties: Become familiar with and participate in activities related to a study that uses electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine brain mechanisms of response to cognitive-behavior therapy in children and adolescents.  Administering and scoring psychological assessments and entering data from paper-and-pencil forms into the electronic database. Opportunities will be available to observe clinical assessments of children participating in studies of behavioral therapy for aggression and anxiety.  The students will learn about conduct of clinical research with pediatric populations.

Hours: 6 to 10 hours per week.

Compensation: Volunteer or course credit.

Contact: Please send CV or resume to denis.sukhodolsky@yale.edu


Researchers: Li Yan McCurdy, Graduate student. Michael Nitabach, Professor of Cellular & Molecular Physiology.

Lab: The Nitabach lab, Department of Cellular & Molecular Physiology, Yale School of Medicine. 

Description: The Nitabach lab is broadly interested in understanding how neural circuits generate complex behaviors in the fruit-fly (Drosophila melanogaster) and worm (C elegans). We use a combination of genetic, neurophysiological, behavioral, and computational tools to probe these circuits. This project in particular is focused on understanding how fruit-flies learn associations between cues and punishment, and then use that information to make decisions. If you’re interested in understanding how dopamine influences learning and behavior, and are excited about getting some wet-lab experience, we’d love to have you as part of our team! 

Duties: We’ve spent the past couple of months setting up a sophisticated behavioral rig, and can’t wait for a motivated undergraduate to start running some behavioral experiments on it! Depending on the student’s commitment and interest, he/she is welcome to become more involved with other components of the project/lab. We are committed to ensuring that you get the most out of this research experience.

Hours: Hours are flexible, but in order to truly benefit from this experience, we recommend at least 10hrs a week. 

Compensation: Volunteer position. Course credit can be arranged.

Contact: Li Yan (liyan.mccurdy@yale.edu


Researchers: Drs. Wendy Silverman, Eli Lebowitz, & Carla Marin, Yale Child Study Center

Lab: Program for Anxiety Disorders, Yale Child Study Center

Description: The Program for Anxiety disorders is seeking talented, highly motivated undergraduates (sophomores and beyond) to participate in research training opportunities at the Yale Child Study Center. Under the direction of Dr. Wendy Silverman, the Program for Anxiety Disorders focuses on developing and evaluating treatments as well as examining

factors relevant to the development and maintenance of anxiety and its disorders in children and adolescents. Training will be provided on the daytoday operations of a childhood anxiety disorders specialty research clinic. Students will learn about anxiety treatment research through direct participation.

Duties: Responsibilities may include administering questionnaires to children and adolescents; assisting in the collection of saliva and blood samples to test oxytocin levels; entering and analyzing data; observing anxiety evaluations by expert clinicians; learning about novel approaches to assessing avoidance and anxiety. Other opportunities may include attending research and clinical meetings with Program for Anxiety faculty and clinicians and attending lectures on childhood psychopathology and related topics.

Hours: 10 hours per week. Scheduling is flexible.

Compensation: Volunteer or course credit.

Contact: If interested, please contact with a copy of your CV or resume: carla.marin@yale.edu


Researcher: Allie Wang, Graduate Student in Psychology; Lab: Automaticity in Cognition, Motivation & Evaluation Lab (PI: John Bargh) 

Summer research topics include:

  • Photo-taking: memory and attention to time and space
  • Selfies: unconscious behavioral changes/regulations 
  • Bodies and meta-beliefs

I am seeking motivated and diligent students who are interested in gaining experience in the full process of conducting research, especially those who are not daunted by logistics in recruitment and running of the experiments including field studies with more interactions. Besides the default commitment above, you are welcome to participate fully in any or all stages of psychological research, including: 

  • formulating and honing research ideas
  • discussing research methods, stimuli and materials
  • analyzing and organizing data and results

Previous research experience is recommended, but not required. 

Hours: Schedule is flexible and can vary week to week depending on your schedule. However, commitment of 8+ hours is highly recommended. Long distance working is a possibility.

Contact: yimeng.wang@yale.edu. Please include a short paragraph describing (1) classes you have taken related to psychology, cognitive science, statistics and computer science, if any (no definite pre-requisite); (2) software skills and prior experience with research; and (3) your year and major.


Researcher: Michael Bronstein (PhD Student; Dr. Tyrone D. Cannon, P.I.)                                      

Description of Position: Seeking dedicated undergraduate students to assist in the design, implementation, and analysis of research projects focusing on cognitive factors related to inflexible beliefs. Assisting with these endeavors may include opportunities to hone important research skills such as data processing and statistics, programming, scientific writing, literature search, and the efficient application of research methods. Exact details of the position are flexible and may be tailored somewhat to your personal goals.

Commitment: At least 5 hours per week, potentially including a weekly meeting. Commitment to the position for at least 2 semesters is preferred, though not required.

Requirements: All applicants must have prior experience conducting research. This research experience can be in any scientific field. Successful applicants are expected to be reliable, conscientious, and capable of interacting with study participants in a professional manner. Applications from interested students with programming acumen will be given priority; if you have such skill, please announce this prominently in your application.   

Compensation: This is a volunteer position.

Contact: For more information, please contact Michael Bronstein at michael.bronstein[at]yale.edu. Please enclose a concise paragraph summarizing any relevant prior coursework or research experience along with the reasons for your interest in the aforementioned position. Please also include your major, class year, and overall GPA.


Researcher: Richard Ahl (PhD Student)

Lab: Cognition & Development Lab

Description: How do children of different ages reason about the “inside parts” of animals and complex artifacts? What expectations do children hold about such features, which are crucial to functioning but hidden from sight? With Dr. Frank Keil, Professor of Psychology, I explore how children and adults mentally represent the “insides” of complex causal systems, such as animals and machines. 

I am seeking diligent, motivated, and detail-oriented research assistants who will help contribute to our projects. RAs will have the opportunity to help design, implement, analyze, and interpret new research studies. RAs will gain first-hand experience with many stages of the research process. Much of our work will involve collecting data with children; previous experience with children is not required, but a willingness to learn is a must!  

Hours: RAs will work 5-10 hours per week (flexible). Attendance at weekly lab meetings (time TBD) is encouraged but not required. Because much of our data collection takes place at children’s museums, RAs must work at least one weekend data collection shift per month.   

Compensation: Volunteer or course credit (half or full).

Contact: To apply or to learn more, please emailrichard.ahl@yale.edu 


Researcher: Anton Gollwitzer, Graduate Student
 
Labs: Automaticity in Cognition, Motivation, and Emotion Lab and the Relationships Lab (PI: Professor John Bargh and Professor Margaret Clark)
 
Description: There are two projects which we are currently working on. (1) Do lay be exist who can accurately judge on average the feelings, thoughts, and behaviors of other people in certain situations? In other words, do ‘super psychologists’ exist in the general population? What cognitive, social, and personality constructs relate to having such an ability? Specific tasks will include reviewing literature, designing experiments, collecting data, editing papers. (2) Can we build algorithms that determine innocence or guilt in criminal court cases? A number of factors have been identified relating to false convictions, false confessions, eye-witness identification, etc. We plan to quantify such factors in innovative ways allowing us to investigate how these factors interact, in turn, leading to wrongful convictions. Specific tasks will include reviewing literature, locating and collecting data, statistical analysis. 
 
Requirements: For (1, see above) experience in experimental design and data collection is required. For (2) statistical and/or computer science experience is preferred, but not required. If you’re interested in either topic feel free to apply despite little experience!
 
Commitment: At least one semester, although hours are flexible.
 
Compensation: Students may enroll for research experience, a senior project, volunteer, and/or depending on the level of contribution be included as an author on possible papers. Please submit your resume and unofficial transcript to anton.gollwitzer@yale.edu, as well as a quick statement specifying why you are interested.

Researcher: Dr. Helena Rutherford, Yale Child Study Center

Description: We are looking for enthusiastic, reliable, and motivated volunteers to engage in experimental research with families during pregnancy and the postpartum period. We want to understand how men and women transition into their parenting role, and how this may be affected by psychopathology (including depression, anxiety, and addiction).

Duties: Responsibilities may include the collection and analysis of EEG, hormonal (oxytocin, cortisol) and behavioral (observational coding, decision making, accuracy and reaction times) measures. Students may also help with recruitment, literature reviews, and manuscript preparation.

Hours: 8-10 hours per week. Scheduling is flexible.

Compensation: Volunteer or course credit.

Contact: If interested, please contact with a copy of your CV or resume: helena.rutherford@yale.edu


Researcher: Adam Chekroud, Graduate Student
 
Lab: Human Neuroscience Laboratory (PI: Professor Gregory McCarthy)
 
Description: Computational approaches to psychiatric illness are attracting growing interest. One line of research concerns the development and application of statistical approaches to psychiatric diagnosis and treatment. We have a number of diagnosis and treatment projects available across Depression, PTSD, and Schizophrenia, along with broader (epidemiological) studies of substance abuse and mental health. We are looking for students with a strong interest in technology and computational research that want to improve the way we analyze and treat mental illness. Our lab has strong ties to Yale-New Haven Hospital, as well as industry/entrepreneurial activities (e.g. our startup company). Specific tasks may include reviewing literature, manipulation of big data (thousands to hundreds of thousands of observations), programming clinical tools that can be distributed at a global scale, and statistical modeling. 
 
Chekroud AM, et al. (2016) Cross-trial prediction of treatment outcome in depression: a machine learning approach. The Lancet Psychiatry 3(3):243–250.
 
Chekroud, AM, Gueorguieva, R., Krystal, J., & McCarthy, G. (in prep). Re-evaluating the efficacy and predictability of antidepressant treatments: a symptom clustering approach. 
 
Requirements: Experience of R and/or Python is required. Majors in statistics, biological, or computer sciences are preferred. Students who wish to work on statistical diagnosis or treatment selection should have a good statistical grounding (e.g. regression, dimension reduction, clustering) and familiarity with R. For those looking to get involved in developing clinical tools and distributing them at scale, experience of Ruby, JavaScript or Python is required.
 
Commitment: At least one semester, although hours are flexible. This will not be an introductory or low-involvement research experience, although highly motivated students are encouraged to apply even if they do not yet have the technical requirements (but wish to learn).
 
Compensation: Students may enroll for research experience, a senior project, or volunteer. Our startup also has funding to hire students after graduation. 
 
Interested? Contact adam.chekroud@yale.edu. Please include a short paragraph explaining your interest in the position as well as a description of prior research experience (if any). Please also include your year, major, GPA, and any technical skills.

Researchers: Alex Kwan, Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Neuroscience; Farhan Ali, Postdoctoral Associate

Lab: The Kwan Lab, Department of Psychiatry, Yale School of Medicine

Description: The Kwan lab is a systems neuroscience lab in the Department of Psychiatry at the Yale School of Medicine. Research in the lab focuses on the role of prefrontal cortex in cognitive behaviors and how neural circuits are impaired in mouse models of neuropsychiatric diseases. Our lab specializes in using optical methods including in vivo cellular-resolution microscopy and optogenetics to record and control neural activity. Visit the lab website for more details (http://medicine.yale.edu/lab/kwan/index.aspx).

Duties: We are looking for undergraduate students to help on a couple of projects in the lab. Tasks include analyzing neurophysiological data, performing brain histology, and training mice. Over time, we expect the project to expand and become more independent, depending on the student’s commitment and interests. In the past two years, a number of lab members have completed honors theses (2), gone on to MD programs (3) or won competitive fellowships (2).

Hours: Students are expected to commit at least 10 hours/week. No prior laboratory experience is required, although you must be motivated and responsible!

Compensation: Volunteer positions. Course credits are possible.

Contact: Alex Kwan (alex.kwan@yale.edu) and Farhan Ali (farhan.ali@yale.edu)


Researcher: Mary O’Brien, Director of Clinical Training, Associate Research Scientist, Yale Psychology Department Clinic

Lab: Yale Psychology Department Clinic

Description: Dr. O’Brien is recruiting for several research assistants to assist with transcribing videotaped interaction of families with a family member at high risk for developing bipolar disorder and with data entry. This work is in collaboration with Dr. David Miklowitz of UCLA.

Duties: Research assistants will be responsible for transcribing videotaped interactions on an independent basis for approximately 4 hours per week. RAs will assist with data entry. RAs with a proven level of commitment and attention to detail may be taught the coding system, which involves assigning specific labels for different behaviors or interaction styles that are visible in the videotapes.

Hours: Due to the high level of training they will receive, research assistants are required to commit to a minimum of 2 consecutive semesters for the present project, working approximately 4 hours per week.

Compensation: Volunteer positions or course credit.

Requirements: No prior experience with psychology research is necessary. However, all applicants are expected to be responsible and skilled in time management and autonomous work.

Location: Yale Psychology Department Clinic, 405 Temple St.

Contact: For more information, contact the Clinic Coordinator, Julia Salinger, at Julia.Salinger@yale.edu. Please include a copy of your CV.


Researcher: Anthony van den Pol, Professor of Neurosurgery and Psychiatry

Lab: van den Pol lab, Department of Neurosurgery, Medical School

Description:

Optogenetics is used to selectively activate or inactivate specific circuits in the brain using a combination of light or laser stimulation with selective expression of optogenetic genes in neuronal pathways. For instance, optogenetic activation of neurons that synthesize melanin concentrating hormone (MCH) increases sleep, whereas stimulation of neighboring hypocretin neurons enhances cognitive arousal and alertness. The student will be involved in behavioral analysis of rodents during optogenetic stimulation or inhibition using a variety of behavioral tests.

 Duties: Students will study the behavioral responses of mice in which selected circuits are activated (or depressed) by optogenetic stimulation. Behaviors may include social  interaction, fear responses,  feeding, learning, motor coordination, aggression, sleep, and cognitive arousal. Behavior is examined with a variety of tests, including video analysis, bar pressing, timing, beam breaks, etc. Student may also be involved in generation of hardware and software suitable for enhancing quantitation of mouse behavior in response to optogenetic stimulation.

Hours: Students should commit to approximately 10 hours per week (for 1 credit) or possibly more hours per week for additional credit. Hours are flexible. Prefer student with potential long term interest in the area.

 Compensation: Course credit,  volunteer , or possible financial support during summer if continuing a project started during spring term.

 Location: 333 Cedar Street,    School of Medicine

 Contact: Anthony van den Pol -   anthony.vandenpol@yale.edu


Researcher: Helen Pushkarskaya, Associate Research Scientist, Yale Medical School
 
Lab: Decision Neuroscience Lab, Section of Comparative and the Yale OCD Research Clinic , Department of Psychiatry
 
Description of the research focus:  My research focuses on individual differences in decision making under uncertainty in healthy, subclinical, and clinical populations. Tools of economics, psychology, neuroscience and clinical sciences are combined to collect and analyze behavioral, self-report, and neuroimaging data.
 
Description of Positions: I am looking for motivated and reliable students who are interested in interdisciplinary research on decision making under uncertainty – working directly with participants as well as becoming an integral part of the Decision Neuroscience Lab and the Yale OCD Research Clinic. You will acquire both a practical and theoretical understanding of how to conduct multi and inter disciplinary experimental procedures through hands-on research experience. A majority of your time will be spent working with participants and/or working with data. Prior research experience is not required. One position is open for the student interested in creating, maintaining, and analyzing a large dataset (of non-clinical and clinical data) that links several cross disciplinary multi sites projects (via REDCap).
 
Commitment: Flexible. This will depend upon whether you volunteer, wish to receive a full credit, or wish to receive a half credit.
 
Compensation: Students may enroll for course credit or volunteer. 
 

Contact: Helen Pushkarskaya (Helen.Pushkarskaya@Yale.edu)


Researcher: Hedy Kober, Assistant Professor, Department of Psychiatry & Psychology, Interdepartmental Neuroscience Program
 
Lab: Clinical & Affective Neuroscience lab
 
Description: How strong is your craving for chocolate? Can you stop yourself from reaching for it when the craving is strong? What are the neural mechanisms that underlie our ability to regulate our craving? The ability to control our craving (and our emotions more generally) is central to mental and physical health, and is particularly critical for those with substance use disorders (AKA ‘addictions’) and binge eating. The work in our lab includes behavioral, clinical, psychophysiological, and functional neuroimaging (fMRI) studies of alcohol drinkers, cigarette smokers, cocaine users, binge eaters, and healthy adults as they regulate craving for food, alcohol, cigarettes, and cocaine, using a variety of strategies. We also investigate how people change following treatment for addictions – do they get better at managing their craving? We investigate both cognitive-behavioral treatments as well as mindfulness-based treatments that include training in meditation. 
For more info on our research and some recent press: 
canlab.med.yale.edu
 
Duties Involved: There are a wide variety of opportunities, depending on a combination of interest, experience, skills, availability, and the lab’s needs. These include: recruiting and screening participants, collection and analysis of behavioral data, collection and analysis of psychophysiology data, collection and analysis of fMRI data – including running scans, programming tasks for behavioral and fMRI tasks, and other fun and educational things. 
 
Schedule: 10 hours per week and a 2-semester commitment are required. Attending weekly 1-hour lab meetings is required. 
 
Compensation: Volunteer or course credit. Provides excellent opportunity for students interested in graduate work in psychology (experimental, cognitive, and clinical), cognitive neuroscience, and psychiatry. 
 
Contact: Please email hedy.kober@yale.edu with a short paragraph describing yourself, your interests, why you want to work in the lab, what you could contribute. 
Be sure to also include the following information:

- Previous research and/or clinical experience (if any)

- Previous coursework in psychology, neuroscience, biology, computer science, or philosophy

- Year, Major, GPA


Researchers: Dr. Marianne LaFrance (Professor), Sara Burke, April Bailey & Natalie Wittlin (Graduate Students).

Lab: Gender Lab

Description:  For students interested in gaining hands-on research experience, several opportunities are available this term in Gender Lab.  We are interested in exploring a number of ways in which gender impacts and is impacted by a number of social psychological processes such as the following: assessing attitudes toward gender non-conforming people (bisexuals, transsexuals, non-binary identified individuals as well as those whose expression is gender a typical) and exploring individual differences in and consequences of holding an androcentric (male-centered) world view,

Compensation: Depending on experience course credit is sometimes provided.  To register, students must attain approval from Professor LaFrance and complete a form for the DUS.

Requirements: Interest in the intersection of psychology and gender.

If Interested: Please email Marianne.lafrance@yale.edu and provide a paragraph describng your interest in joining the lab and any relevant experience.


Researcher: Avram Holmes (PI)

Lab: Holmes Lab (http://holmeslab.yale.edu)

Description of position: The Holmes Lab seeks motivated undergraduates who are looking to gain experience in clinical and cognitive neuroscience. Our research is focused on discovering the fundamental organization of large-scale human brain networks and the establishment of biological markers of psychiatric illness risk. Current projects are examining the psychological, environmental, and biological mechanisms that link phenotypic characteristics within a population and the behavioral and neural basis of reward based goal attainment.

Duties: There is opportunity for participation at every phase of the research process, including study design, data collection, processing, analysis, and presentation. Interested and motivated students may learn neuroimaging techniques, including the collection, preprocessing, and analysis of fMRI data. 

Requirements: Students must be seeking significant participation in the research process. Although experience with a programming language (e.g. R, Matlab, Python, C++) is not required, a desire to learn is a must. Applicants should be comfortable with scheduling and running research participants. Preference will be given to students with long-term interests in clinical and cognitive neuroscience research. 

Compensation: Volunteer (3-8 hours) or Research Credit (10 hours). Hours are flexible.

Contact: For more information, please contact the lab manager, Lauren Patrick, at lauren.patrick@yale.edu. Please include a brief statement detailing your goals, a description of prior research experience (if any) and a copy of your CV.


ResearcherChristina Starmans (Postdoc), Paul Bloom (PI)

Lab: Mind and Development Lab (aka Elephant Lab)

The MaD Lab studies how children & adults understand the physical and social world, including topics such as: morality and how it develops; intuitions about personal identity, free will, and the self; the origin of religious belief; and the strange pleasures we get from fiction and art. 

Research Assistants work 8-10 hours per week and participate in all aspects of our research. Students are involved in testing children in the lab, at museums, and in preschools, as well as helping to plan experiments, recruiting and scheduling subjects, and the day-to-day running of the lab. Students also attend weekly lab meetings where we discuss ongoing studies, possible next directions, relevant research findings from other labs, etc. As an RA in the lab, you will acquire both a practical and theoretical understanding of experimental procedures through hands-on research experience with both children (ages 3-12) and adults. Students also have the opportunity to interact with graduate students and postdoctoral fellows who can offer advice and guidance for anyone interested in pursuing a future in psychology. You can find information about the Mind and Development Lab at www.yale.edu/minddevlab

To learn more or apply for a position, please contact christina.starmans@yale.edu


Principal Investigator: Dr. Jutta Joormann, Professor of Psychology

Lab: The Affect Regulation & Cognition (ARC) Lab
 
Description: The ARC lab is looking for highly motivated Yale undergraduates who are interested in gaining clinical research experience. Our lab aims to identify cognitive processes (e.g., attention, memory, cognitive control) associated with the etiology and maintenance of depression and anxiety disorders. We also examine the nature of emotion regulation as it relates to cognition and psychopathology. In line with these aims, we ask questions such as, why do certain individuals have difficulty down-regulating negative emotion following stressful life events and why do some struggle to experience positive emotion during reward activities? Our lab utilizes multiple research methods, such as clinical interviews, eye-tracking, psychophysiology, cortisol, EEG, and fMRI to address our research questions. Research assistants will gain extensive experience in research design, multi-method data collection, and data analysis. Specifically, RAs will help conduct phone interviews to screen clinical participants, run study protocols, and process multiple types of data. They will also participate in journal clubs and have opportunities to give research presentations during lab meetings.
 
 
Hours: We expect research assistants to make a 2-semester commitment to the lab, volunteering 10 hours per week each semester. This hourly requirement includes a weekly lab meeting.
 
Requirements: No direct psychology research experience necessary. However, those with previous experience in computer programing or in processing psychophysiological data are especially encouraged to apply. All research assistants are expected to be responsible, detail-oriented, and eager to learn about clinical psychological science.
Compensation: Volunteer positions with the possibility of working for course credit.
For more information, contact the ARC lab at jutta.joormann@yale.edu. Please be sure to attach a CV or resume to your e-mail.

Researcher: Dr. Barkha Patel, Postdoctoral Fellow

Lab: Neuropsychology and Physiology of Flavor and Feeding Lab (PI: Dr. Dana Small, Professor, Department of Psychiatry and Psychology)

Description: Our lab is interested in identifying neural factors that contribute to taste intensity perception in humans and to determine environmental mechanisms that contribute to variation in taste sensitivity. Significant controversy surrounds the possibility that consumption of artificial sweeteners (AFS) leads to weight gain. Some studies have found correlations between AFS use and weight gain and/or diabetes while others have indicated that AFSs may aid in weight loss or have no effects on body mass index (BMI). Consumption of AFS has increased substantially since 1999-2000 in children and adolescents, yet the effect of AFS exposure on sweet taste intensity perception has not been assessed in this group. We use functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) as well as psychophysical (taste intensity ratings) and neuro-hormonal measures to address these questions.

Requirements: Background in Psychology, or Cognitive Science, or Neuroscience. Some statistical and programming skills preferred.

Hours: Students must commit to 8-10 hours a week (flexible). Participation in a weekly lab meeting strongly encouraged.

Compensation: course credit or volunteer.

Contact Barkha Patel at bpatel@jbpierce.org. Please include a short paragraph explaining your interest in the position as well as a description of prior research experience (if any).


Researcher: Gregg Castellucci (Graduate Student in Neurobiology and Linguistics, Advisor: David McCormick)

Lab: McCormick Lab (McCormicklab.org)

Description of position for Spring 2016 (and onwards): We are looking for motivated undergraduate students who are interested in performing supervised, independent research on the neuroscience of animal communication. This project specifically examines the development of the mouse courtship song behavior, and how the production of this song is modulated through genetic mutation of genes implicated in human speech and language disorders.

Duties: Students will be primarily responsible for recording and analyzing mouse vocalizations. Additional responsibilities will vary based on the interest of the student, and - for example - could include: 1) designing behavioral paradigms using vocalizations as stimuli, 2) performing calcium imaging experiments examining auditory responses to vocalizations, 3) exploring the neurophysiology of the mouse vocal apparatus, and 4) running human subjects in a speech perception study.

Hours: Students should commit to approximately 10 hours per week for 0.5-1 credit or more for additional credit. Alternatively, students could commit less time on a volunteer basis. Hours are flexible.

Compensation: Course credit and volunteer opportunities are available.

Location: 333 Cedar Street, SHM, School of Medicine Campus

Contact: Gregg Castellucci (gregg.castellucci@yale.edu)

 
 

Researchers: Marc Brackett (Director), Susan Rivers (Deputy Director), Lori Nathanson (Director of Research)
 
Lab: Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence
 
Description of position: The Center seeks motivated undergraduates who are looking to develop their psychological and educational research skills by conducting classroom observations, helping to create study-related materials, conducting literature reviews, screening and running participants through lab experiments, assisting with data collection and analyses, attending project-related and general lab meetings, and participating in day-to-day research operations.
 
Yale students will have the opportunity to contribute one of the Center’s research projects. The Center uses the power of emotions to create a more effective and compassionate society. We conduct research and teach people of all ages how to develop their emotional intelligence.
 
Schedule: Flexible, 10 hours per week, 2-semester commitment desired. Attending 1-hour lab meetings (3 times a month) preferred, but not required.
 
Compensation: Course credit
 
Contact: 
1) Complete an online application.
2) Upload to Box a one-page cover letter and resume.
The one-page cover letter should address the special background or skills you would bring to the Center, your relevant experiences, and what you hope to gain from working at the Center.
*Note: please submit your cover letter and resume as PDF files and name them “LastName.coverletter.pdf” and “LastName.resume.pdf”
 

Researchers: Molly Crossman (Graduate Student) & Dr. Alan Kazdin (PI)

Lab:  Innovative Interactions Lab

Description:  For students interested in gaining hands-on research experience, several opportunities are available this term at the Yale Innovative Interactions Lab (iilab.yale.edu). Our lab (located on campus at 309 Edwards St.) is dedicated to learning more about how children and youth interact with animals and robots to improve their own wellbeing and cope with the challenges of daily life. Students will be involved in recruiting and running participants in studies involving dogs and robots. Students will work directly with children (ages 6-13), parents, and therapy dog teams. Students may also be involved in conducting literature reviews, conducting online studies, and data entry. This is an excellent experience for students interested in clinical psychology, children and families, human-animal interaction, and research.

Compensation: Course credit is provided for the experience (although some students wish to volunteer without credit). To register students must obtain approval from the Instructor (A. Kazdin) and complete a form for the Director of Undergraduate Studies.

Requirements:  Interest in children and clinical child psychology and ability to work with animals (students who have allergies to animal dander or saliva or who are afraid of dogs should not apply). A limited number of positions are available.  

Schedule:  The time is flexible and scheduled individually for each student, but students must be available during afterschool (between 2:00 PM and 7:00 PM) hours at least two days per week to facilitate participant scheduling.  Each student should plan on approximately 8 hours per week at the lab.

Additional Information.  This is an excellent opportunity gain hands-on research experience. Students will learn about clinical psychology, novel methods of mental health treatment, human-animal interaction, and research methods. The experience is particularly valuable for students considering graduate school in clinical psychology. 

If Interested:  For further details or to enroll, please e-mail molly.crossman@yale.edu. If interested, please include a short paragraph explaining your interest in the position, your previous research experience (if any), and a CV if you have one.

Visit our website:

iilab.yale.edu


Researcher: Frank Keil, Professor of Psychology

Lab: Cognition and Development Lab

Description: Seeking undergraduate research assistants to continue ongoing projects and pursue new ventures in investigating the development of causal reasoning, critical thinking, and metacognition. Responsibilities include research support at all levels; i.e., development of new materials, recruitment of participants, running of studies, and analysis of data. Other responsibilities as assigned. Please review the information on our website (http://cogdevlab.sites.yale.edu/) for description of research focus.

Commitment: At least one semester, 5-10 hours per week (flexible). Participation in weekly lab meetings (Tuesday, 2:30-4:00) strongly encouraged.

Compensation: Work study, directed research course credit, or volunteer.

Interested Students: Contact Frank Keil at frank.keil@yale.edu


Researcher: Kristi Lockhart, Senior Lecturer

Lab: Cognition and Development Lab (Manager: Mariel Goddu)

Description of position: Undergraduate research assistants are needed for projects examining children’s intuitions about bragging and boasting.

Requirements:  Experience working with children, background in psychology, and some degree of artistic skills would be a plus.

Hours: Students must commit to 5-10 hours a week and attend a weekly lab meeting.

Compensation: Work study, directed research course credit, or volunteer.

Interested Students: Contact the lab manager at cognition.development+ras@yale.edu.


Researcher: Erica Boothby, Graduate Student
 

Labs: Automaticity in Cognition, Motivation & Evaluation Lab (PI: John Bargh) & Close Relationships & Emotion Lab (PI: Margaret Clark)

We are interested in many broad questions about social life and the social biases to which we are susceptible. How does sharing an experience with another person change our perceptions and judgments of what we’re experiencing? How much time do people spend observing and wondering about other people, and are we blind to how much other people tend to watch and think about us? To what extent do people think about one another when they’re apart? Are people aware of the impact they have on others? We are additionally exploring how people think about strangers (vs. people they know) and when people assume others are similar to themselves and when people assume others are different.

Position: We are looking for motivated and diligent students who wish to participate fully in all aspects of psychological research – planning experiments, preparing experimental materials, recruiting and running participants, analyzing data, and discussing ideas. As an undergraduate in the lab, you will acquire both a practical and theoretical understanding of experimental procedures through hands-on research experience. Prior research experience is a bonus but not required.

Commitment: 7-10 hours/week with flexible hours; students are encouraged (though not required) to work in the lab for at least 2 semesters.

Compensation: Course credit or volunteer. 

Contact: Erica Boothby (erica.boothby@yale.edu


Researcher: Joan Monin, PhD, Assistant Professor, Yale School of Public Health

Lab: Social Gerontology and Health Laboratory

Location: 55 Church Street, Suite 801

Description of position:  We welcome students who are interested in emotions, relationship processes, and health in older adults.  Studies involve interview and experimental protocols, cardiovascular physiology monitoring (blood pressure and heart rate), and coding facial expression.

Duties:  Research assistants are needed to help recruit, schedule, and conduct interviews with older adult participants.  We also need help running an experiment using audio-visual and physiological monitoring equipment.  Students also have the opportunity to learn more about data analysis, coding facial expressions, and guidance investigating their own research questions related to this work.

Requirements: Research assistants must be responsible and organized.  Prior experience working with older adults with physical disabilities is appreciated but not required.

Schedule:  Flexible, 8-10 hours per week.

Compensation: Volunteer or Course Credit

Contact: Please email joan.monin@yale.edu if interested.


Researcher: Roseanna Sommers, Graduate Student in psychology and law

Description: I am seeking 1-2 research assistants to help with multiple projects at the intersection of psychology and law. I am interested in how judges and juries make decisions, and how their decision processes are influenced by social and cognitive factors. I study how bias, prejudice, discrimination, motivated reasoning, and cognitive heuristics impact our legal system.

I am looking for motivated and diligent students who are interested in the intersection of psychology and law. This position will be particularly enriching for undergraduates who plan to attend law school or pursue an advanced degree in psychology or public policy. You will have the opportunity to participate fully in all stages of psychological research: conducting literature searches, planning experiments, designing study stimuli and materials, recruiting research participants, administering study materials, analyzing data, and discussing results. If you wish, you will also have the opportunity to read legal texts and cases.

Requirements: Previous research experience is recommended, but not required.

Compensation: volunteer only (no course credit)

Hours: 5-10 hours per week on average, with flexible hours.

Contact: roseanna.sommers@yale.edu. Please include a short paragraph describing (1) any classes you have taken related to psychology, law, or policy, if any; (2) any prior work experience, if any; and (3) your year and major.


Researcher:  Sam Johnson, Graduate Student

Lab:  Cognition and Development Lab

Mental life is largely about making sense of things. We humans are obsessed with finding the causes of the events around us, using concepts to carve up experience, and trying to understand more generally why things are the way they are. Like other humans, I too am obsessed with these things, and my collaborators and I use scientific tools to try to make sense of sense-making. We are committed to interdisciplinary research that uses ideas from philosophy and economics, and that bridges cognitive and social psychology. We study both adults and children– because children tell us not only cute things, but also a great deal about where our reasoning skills come from.

I’m looking for undergraduate researchers to be active collaborators on this research, helping to answer these and related questions. Students will have the opportunity to be involved with every facet of the research process, including developing ideas, designing and conducting studies, creating stimulus materials, and some data analysis. No previous research experience is necessary– but passion and attention to detail are helpful!

Compensation:  Course credit (10 hrs/week required) or volunteer (flexible commitment). Attendance at weekly lab meetings is encouraged!

Contact: Sam Johnson (samuel.johnson@yale.edu)


Researcher: Marvin Chun (Professor)

Lab: Visual Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory, Department of Psychology

Description of position: The student will be involved in cognitive neuroscience research using fMRI and computational modeling.  Most of the work will involve analyzing data, although we may also seek assistance in developing and running experiments.  In the past, advanced students have published refereed journal papers from the lab (http://camplab.psych.yale.edu/links.html).

Requirements: The student should have superb analytic and programming skills. Experience with Matlab, Python, and/or machine learning techniques would be a plus, but not necessary. 

Hours: Between 5-10 hours a week. Scheduling is flexible.

Compensation: Volunteer or course credit.  With sufficient lab experience, the position can be converted to a paid position.  

Contact: For more information about this position, please contact Professor Marcin Chun atmarvin.chun@yale.edu[mailto].  For more information about relevant projects, please visit: http://camplab.psych.yale.edu/.


Researcher: James McPartland, PhD

Lab: McPartland Lab
 
Description: We are looking for undergraduate students to participate in our lab for the spring semester of 2016. In the McPartland lab, we use EEG, eye tracking, and behavioral assessment to understand social brain functioning and associated behavior in children, adults, and infants with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), as well as in adults with schizophrenia and typically developing controls. We use novel methods that more closely approximate true social interactions in order to better understand the challenges experienced by people with ASD. Undergraduates in our lab receive hands on experience in research of the clinical neuroscience of autism spectrum disorder and related neurodevelopmental disorders.
Students in the lab will learn about using electroencephalography in infants, children and adults. Tasks will include EEG, eye tracking, and behavioral data collection, processing, and entry and hands-on work with participants. Undergraduates will be assigned projects based on a combination of their interests and the lab’s needs and will also contribute to the ongoing needs of the overall lab.
 
Requirements: Background or interest in psychology or neuroscience. Experience with human subjects preferred.
 
Hours: Students must commit to 8-10 hours a week.
 
Compensation: Course credit or volunteer.
 
Location: 230 South Frontage Road, Child Study Center, Yale School of Medicine 
Interested students may receive an application for the lab by emailing mcp.lab@yale.edu and expressing interest in the position. More information about the lab can be found at http://medicine.yale.edu/lab/mcpartland/
 

Researcher: Brian Scholl, Professor of Psychology

Lab: Perception & Cognition Lab

Description: The Yale Perception & Cognition Lab currently has openings for Yale undergraduates, to help study the nature of visual perception and cognition.  For information, see: http://www.yale.edu/perception/Brian/misc/jobs.html


Researcher: Dr. Laurie Santos, Professor of Psychology

Lab: Canine Cognition Center at Yale, Department of Psychology

Description of position: The Comparative Cognition Laboratory (CapLab) explores the evolutionary origins of the human mind by comparing the cognitive abilities of human and other animals. The lab is currently working on a number of different projects exploring canine cognition, exploring how dogs make sense of their physical and social world.

Students who join the lab will participate in ongoing research projects investigating dog cognition.  Students will aid in planning and carrying out studies with a team of other students.  Students will participate in conducting studies, as well as in coding and analysis of data and will also have the opportunity to work directly with the dogs we study.

Hours: Students taking the course for directed research (PSYC 493) credit must commit to at least 8 hours/week plus a weekly discussion meeting. Students taking the course for half credit (PSYC 495) credit must commit to at least 6 hours/week plus a weekly discussion meeting. Students should also expect to participate in weekly response papers as well as a final paper.

Compensation: Students interested in the lab for the spring semester must enroll in either a directed research 493 course or a PSYC 495 course.

Contact: Positions are very limited for the Fall 2016 semester. If you are interested, please contact Dr. Laurie Santos (laurie.santos@yale.edu) before September 1, 2016


Researcher: Karen Wynn, Professor of Psychology and Cognitive Science

Lab: Infant Cognition Center

My research investigates core structures of cognition; those inherent cognitive mechanisms with which we interpret incoming information and which enable us to make sense of and reason about the world. My students and I are studying various aspects of cognition within the first months of life, prior to the influences of language, culture, education, and extensive experience. The aim of our research is to gain a better understanding of how the human mind is inherently structured to interpret and make sense of the world – what is the nature of the underlying mechanisms of thought. Our work is currently focused around several central areas of research, including the developmental underpinnings of moral cognition, early reasoning about social groups, including biases for ingroup members and stereotypes of/prejudices against outgroup members, and the influence of early environment and experience in these domains.  More information about our areas of investigation and recent research findings can be found athttp://pantheon.yale.edu/~kw77/Research.html.

Research Assistants participate fully in all aspects of our research. Students are involved in testing infants, planning experiments, recruiting and scheduling subjects, and the day-to-day running of the lab.  Students also attend weekly lab meetings where we discuss the theoretical motivation for current experiments, results of recently completed experiments, possible next directions, relevant research findings from other labs, and so on. As an undergraduate in the lab, you will acquire both a practical and theoretical understanding of experimental procedures through hands-on research experience. Students also have the opportunity to interact with graduate students and postdoctoral fellows who can offer advice and guidance for anyone interested in pursuing a future in psychology. You can find information about the Infant Cognition Lab athttp://www.yale.edu/infantlab

No previous research experience is necessary. Applicants must be willing and able to commit 10 hours per week to the lab, and should be comfortable interacting with parents and children in person and over the phone, as this is a primary responsibility. Compensation may be for course credit or as a volunteer.

Contact: Shelley Mackinnon, the BabyLab Manager, at shelley.mackinnon@yale.edu


Researcher: Dr Paul Geha, Instructor at Department of Psychiatry

Lab: Pain and Pleasure Lab (PI: Paul Geha, MD)

Description: Pain and Pleasure are mediated by overlapping neurochemical pathways; however, little is known about how the brain mediates the perception of pain and pleasure using very similar brain circuitry and neurochemicals. The interaction of pain and pleasure in the brain is reflected in co-morbid conditions such as chronic pain and obesity. Hence, pathological pain and overeating (due to disruption in perception of food pleasure) are good clinical examples of how we can tackle this question. We use functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) as well as psychophysical (pain and food pleasure perception) and neuro-hormonal measures to address these questions.

Requirements:  Background in Psychology, or Cognitive Science, or Neuroscience. Some statistical and programming skills preferred.

Hours: Students must commit to 8-10 hours a week (flexible) and attend a weekly lab meeting.

Compensation: Course credit or volunteer with eventual possibility of co-authorship.

Interested Students: Contact Paul Geha at paul.geha@yale.edu. Please include a short paragraph explaining your interest in the position as well as a description of prior research experience (if any).


Researcher: Ifat Levy, Assistant Professor

Lab: Decision Neuroscience Lab, Yale School of Medicine

Description: Our lab studies decision-making processes in humans. In our experiments we use behavioral economics methods to characterize the behavior of our subjects and structural and functional MRI to unravel the neural basis of the observed behavior. We focus on situations in which the consequences of different choices are not known for sure and examine individual differences in the ability to cope with uncertainty and to reduce uncertainty. Some of our studies ask basic-science question about the healthy intact brain, and others focus on changes in development, aging, obesity and mental illness.

Description of position: Students can take part in all aspects of the studies, depending on their interests and qualifications and on the lab’s needs. This includes writing scripts and constructing stimuli, recruiting, screening and running subjects (behaviorally and in MRI experiments), entering and analyzing data. No previous experience is necessary, but programming skills are highly desirable. Applicants should be highly organized, responsible and comfortable working with study participants.

Hours: At least 6 hours/week (8 or more are preferable) and participation in weekly lab meetings.

Compensation: Course credit or volunteer 

Contact: Dr. Ifat Levy: ifat.levy@yale.edu


Researcher: Kevin Anderson (graduate student), Avram Holmes (PI)

Description of position: 1-2 research assistantships available to help investigate the behavioral and neural basis of reward based goal attainment. This research pursues basic cognitive neuroscience questions, but is highly relevant for students with an interest in clinical neuroscience and the brain basis of psychopathology. The study will occur across the year, with primary data collection taking place during the Summer and Fall of 2015. 

Duties: There is opportunity for participation at every phase of the research process, including data collection, processing, analysis, and presentation. Interested and motivated students may learn neuroimaging techniques, including the collection, preprocessing, and analysis of fMRI data. 

Requirements: Students must be seeking significant participation in the research process. Although experience with a programming language (e.g. R, Matlab, Python, C++) is not required, a desire to learn is a must. Applicants should be comfortable with scheduling and running research participants. Preference will be given to students with long-term interests in cognitive neuroscience research. 

Compensation: Volunteer (3-8 hours) or Research Credit (10 hours). Hours are flexible.

Contact: For more information, please contact Kevin Anderson at kevin.anderson@yale.edu. Please include a short paragraph explaining your goals as well as a description of prior research experience (if any). Please also include your year, major, and GPA.


Researcher: Dr. Steve Chang, Assistant Professor of Psychology

Lab: Chang Lab (SSS building & SHM building), Department of Psychology

Description of the lab: Our research is aimed at understanding neural mechanisms of social behavior. To answer our questions, we apply both neurophysiological and neuroendocrinological techniques while nonhuman primates are actively engaged in social interactions. We also study fundamental aspects of decision-making in order to better understand how basic neural mechanisms are recruited for social behavior. **More information can be found here: http://changlab.net/

Description of the position: Students will have the opportunity to be involved in neuroscientific studies of social behavior in rhesus monkeys, including data collection and data analysis. Students will be first assigned to one of the lab members but will also have an opportunity to be more independent.

Compensation: Students may enroll for credit or volunteer. Students working on a research project in the lab may have a chance to further pursue their work in the future (e.g., senior thesis, more research experience for graduate school).

Contact: steve.chang@yale.edu


Lab: Alan E. Kazdin, Ph.D., Yale Parenting Center

Description.  For students interested in clinical research and practicum experience, opportunities are available this term at the Yale Parenting Center http://yaleparentingcenter.yale.edu/. The Center (on campus at 314 Prospect Street) is an outpatient treatment service for the parents of children who are referred for oppositional, aggressive, and antisocial behavior.   Students will work at the clinic and become involved in research projects involving children, families, treatment or related topics.  This is an excellent experience for students interested in clinical psychology, children and families, clinical work and research.
 
Course Credit.  Course credit is provided for the experience (although some students wish to volunteer without credit).  To register students must obtain approval from the Instructor (A. Kazdin) and complete a form for the Director of Undergraduate Studies.
 
Requirements.  Interest in children and clinical child psychology.  A limited number of positions are available.  
 
Class Schedule.  The time is flexible and scheduled individually for each student.  Each student should plan on approximately 8 hours per week at the Center during regular Center hours Monday through Thursday 9 AM to 5 PM.
 
Additional Information.  This is an excellent opportunity to work on clinical research in clinical psychology.  Students will work with a team of clinical staff, learn about childhood disorders, cognitive and behavioral treatment, and participate in a variety of activities, including informal seminars.  The experience is particularly valuable for students considering graduate school in clinical psychology.  There are no exams although there is a seminar series at the Center as part of the course and a brief paper that cannot be used to meet the senior requirement.
 
If Interested.  For further details or to enroll, please read more details at our website: http://yaleparentingcenter.yale.edu/internships and then email Jennifer.Pope@yale.edu or call  203-432-9764. 
 
Visit some of our Websites:
 

Researchers: Janet Lydecker (post-doctoral fellow), Carlos Grilo (Professor of Psychiatry)

Lab: Program for Obesity, Weight, and Eating Research at Yale School of Medicine
 
Description:  This is a research internship opportunity for undergraduate students interested in clinical research on eating disorders, obesity, and weight bias. The opportunity provides exposure to large-scale clinical research trials, as well as experience working on mentored research projects from start to finish.  Minimum 6 hours/week, which includes a 1-hour didactic/lab meeting.  
 
Compensation: Possibility of course credit, depending on student experience and interest. 
 
Requirements: Junior or Senior majoring in Psychology or health-related discipline.
 
If Interested: Please email janet.lydecker@yale.edu with a resume (CV) and cover letter explaining your interest and experience.
 

Researchers: Rebecca Fortgang (Faculty Adviser: Tyrone Cannon)
 
Description: The Clinical Neuroscience Lab is seeking highly motivated Yale undergraduate students to interesting in learning about various aspects of psychological research. Currently, we are seeking research assistants to help with a project studying self-control, motivation, and persistence. In particular, we currently have a position open for a student with programming skills (e.g. R, Matlab, Python). 
 
What we are interested in: How do people push themselves to complete difficult or boring tasks they do not feel like doing? What helps or hinders this process? How do impairments in this ability play into disorder processes in schizophrenia? 
 
What you will learn: RAs will learn to perform a formal literature search, run participants from Yale University and from the general community, code data, and administer cognitive tests (such as components of an intelligence test). In the lab, we also use methodologies including genetics analyses, family studies, and neuroimaging, and RAs particularly interested in those methods may gain relevant experience. Additionally, RAs will be encouraged to be involved in task design and programming and to generate independent study ideas to potentially complete in the lab. (This latter option is open to RAs who have worked in the lab for at least 2 semesters or 1 semester and 1 summer.) 
 
Hours: We expect research assistants to make a 2-semester commitment to the lab, volunteering approximately 10 hours per week each semester, including a one-hour project meeting every week. 
 
Requirements: No direct psychology research experience is necessary. However, those with previous experience in computer programing are especially encouraged to apply. All research assistants are expected to be responsible, detail-oriented, and eager to learn about clinical psychological science, and all should be comfortable running research participants.
 
Compensation: We are offering volunteer positions with the possibility of working for course credit. Payment by the hour may be available specifically for advanced programming.
 
For more information, contact Rebecca Fortgang at rebecca.fortgang@yale.edu. Please be sure to attach a CV or resume to your e-mail.
 

Researcher: Arielle Baskin-Sommers (Professor)
 
Lab: Mechanisms of Disinhibition (MoD) Lab http://modlab.yale.edu/
 
Description: The MoD Lab is looking for intelligent and motivated undergraduate research assistants. Research in the MoD Lab utilizes interdisciplinary theoretical principles and methods (e.g., electrophysiology, neuroimaging, self-report) to distinguish cognitive-affective deficits associated with disinhibited traits, behaviors, and syndromes (e.g., impulsivity, externalizing, substance abuse, aggression, antisocial personality disorder, psychopathy, etc.). 
 
Duties: Research assistants in the MoDLab can learn how to work with data, conduct phone screens, diagnostic interviewing, psychophysiological research (EEG), behavioral studies, and complete research in accordance with human subjects protections. Research assistants will also be exposed to discussions about the design of new experiments that evaluate cognitive-affective processes implicated in disinhibited behavior. 
 
Hours: It is expected that undergraduate research assistants commit to the lab for two semesters, work approximately 10 hours per week, and attend the weekly lab meeting. Hours are flexible.
 
Compensation: Course credit and volunteer opportunities are available.
 
Location: 2 Hillhouse Ave, Kirtland, B13
 
Contact: Arielle Baskin-Sommers (arielle.baskin-sommers@yale.edu
 

Researcher: Various (PI: Dr. Yarrow Dunham, Assistant Professor)
 
Lab: Social Cognitive Development Lab (aka Tiger Lab)
 
The SCD Lab is looking for highly motivated Yale undergraduates who are interested in helping us uncover how children and adults perceive the world around them and, more specifically, how they think and reason about social groups and intergroup experiences. Research assistants will be directly involved in preparation of experiments, facilitation of experiments (within the lab and during school and museum visits) and data collection. RAs may support ongoing projects in the lab or be assigned to a specific study, depending on need. 
 
Some short descriptions of graduate student and post-doctoral research interests follow.
 
Richard Ahl (3rd year graduate student): Investigates the causes underlying the early emergence of pro-wealth bias in children between the ages of 4 and 8. A current study explores how information about others’ wealth may influence children’s expectations about others’ giving behaviors. A separate project explores how children use information about shared likes and dislikes when making social judgments. 
 
Alexander Noyes (1st year graduate student): Investigates children and adult’s beliefs about social categories (i.e., how membership is explained; for example, believing that race is explained by genes and ancestry). One current child study investigates children’s beliefs about the ability to change group membership and the properties that may be required for change. One adult study investigates beliefs about transgender and transracial as a way of understanding causal beliefs about gender and race.
 
Ashley Jordan (1st year graduate student): Investigates how children reason about social categories and the roles that similarity and social identity play in their reasoning. Ashley also works in the Baby Lab and may have RAs split time between the two labs.
 
Fan Yang (post-doc): Investigates how children think about different groups (e.g. race, gender, language). A current, ongoing study compares how minimal groups and real social groups affect children’s attitudes and cognition.
 
You-jung Choi (post-doc): Investigates how group membership influences children’s thoughts and behaviors. A current study examines whether group membership affects children’s social evaluations of others.
 
Antonia Misch (post-doc): Investigates how group membership influences children’s perception, cognition and behavior. A current study looks at how children’s prosocial behavior is influenced by watching their group members behave prosocially versus antisocially in a sharing task.
 
Jonathan Schulz (post-doc): Investigates children’s decision-making. A current study looks at how cognitive load affects children’s decisions in an economic game.
 
Commitment/Expectations: RAs will be expected to work 6-10 hours per week (flexible) during the academic year and are encouraged to attend weekly lab meetings (Wednesdays, 10-11:25 AM) and work at least one weekend museum shift per month. RAs should be comfortable interacting with young children ages 3-12 as well as parents in person and over the phone. 
 
Compensation: RAs may volunteer or earn course credit for their involvement.
 
To learn more or apply for a position, please contact the lab manager, Shaina Coogan, at shaina.coogan@yale.edu. If you are interested in a specific grad student or post-doc’s work, please indicate that in your email.
 

Researcher: Andrea Vial (graduate student)

Description: I am currently seeking 2 undergraduate research assistants to help design and run new experimental studies starting this Spring. My research examines whether men and women are held to the same or different moral standards. I look at this in the context of leadership. For example, whether gender stereotypes around moral behavior could account for prejudice against women in decision-making roles and positions of authority.
 
Students will participate in ongoing research, conduct literature reviews, prepare experimental materials, design stimuli, program and monitor electronic surveys for online data collection, analyze data with guidance, write up results and create graphs to communicate findings to others. As an undergraduate in the lab you will gain sophisticated knowledge of the project you participate in, with the goal of being able to communicate your detailed understanding of the research to others. In addition to learning about gender and morality, students will learn how to run a study from start to finish. 
 
Requirements: I am looking for highly motivated and diligent students who wish to participate fully in psychological research. Background in psychology is required, with some statistical and programming skills preferred. Prior experience in a lab or doing psychological research is a bonus but not required. All research assistants are expected to be responsible, detail-oriented, and eager to learn.
 
Commitment and Hours: 5-8 hours/week with flexible scheduling, working physically at the lab or remotely. If student is interested, he/she may also attend a weekly lab meeting. I expect research assistants to make a 2-semester commitment to the lab.
 
Compensation: Volunteer only (no credit).
 
Contact: Andrea Vial (andrea.vial@yale.edu). Please be sure to attach a CV or resume to your e-mail, including your (1) year, major, and GPA; (2) relevant coursework; and (3) previous research experience (if any). 
 

Researcher: Jack Tsai Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, Director of Division of Mental Health Services Research

 
Lab: Tsai Lab, Department of Psychiatry
 
Description: We conduct research in three main areas of research: 1) health services for disadvantaged populations, including homeless and formerly incarcerated individuals; 2) trauma-related phenomenon including posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms, posttraumatic growth, and resilience; and 3) using big data to examine trends in health insurance, service use, and other constructs of interest. Much of our work involves the U.S. veteran population. Some further details can be found on our website: http://medicine.yale.edu/lab/tsai/. We welcome students interested in learning about mental health services. Not a requirement, but we’d be especially interest in students who write well, have prior research experience, or know how to analyze data. Students can assist on a project or potentially plan and start their own project (e.g., senior project).
 
Commitment: Flexible, which can be discussed. 
 
Compensation: Students may enroll for course credit or volunteer.
 
Contact: Jack Tsai (Jack.Tsai@yale.edu). Please include a short paragraph explaining your background and interest, and whether you’d be enrolling for course credit.