Yarrow Dunham

Assistant Professor of Psychology

Ed.D., 2007, Harvard University
Address: K 304
Phone: 203-436-1315
Email: yarrow.dunham@yale.edu
Lab Website

Research Interests:

My lab focuses on intergroup social cognition. Humans are perhaps the most social species on the planet. One prominent form this sociality takes is the tendency to divide individuals into social groups. Most species do this in a very limited set of ways, forming groups on just a few dimensions such as biological relatedness and sex. By contrast, humans are not only willing to accept but seemingly driven to create groups based on myriad other properties including shared beliefs (e.g. religion), shared origins (e.g. nationality), shared traits (e.g. introverts), and shared affiliations (e.g. Yankees fans). Once we are in such groups, they systematically affect how we see the world, for example by biasing our attention towards positive features of the ingroup. Indeed, this tendency is so general that we will even start to immediately prefer previously unfamiliar groups to which we have been randomly assigned!

What are the origins of this pervasive psychological tendency? My lab addresses this question by studying how knowledge of social groups is acquired, both in cognitively mature adults and in the developing minds of children. Out of the universe of properties along which people differ, how do we decide which to use as the basis of social groups? Do we have natural tendencies to partition the social world in certain ways? What is the role of cultural input in shaping the intergroup mind? We employ experimental and cross-cultural methodologies to gain purchase on these questions.

Some specific current research topics include:

  • Group Evaluation. All other things being equal, belonging to a group induces a positive evaluation of that group. What specific psychological processes underlie this tendency, and what consequences does it have for other aspects of social functioning?
  • Social Status. Social groups are frequently arrayed into hierarchies that partially structure the larger social order. What aspects of the environment do children use to infer the presence of social hierarchy, and what are the consequences of belonging to groups at different positions along it?
  • Category Acquisition and Category Extension: Do children expect individuals to cluster into groups, and if so do they have any concrete expectations about the nature of such groups? Once they have a rudimentary understanding of a particular social group, how do they learn to identify members of the group in a big, complex world?

I am currently recruiting graduate students who are interested in pursuing a rigorous program of research in this area. If you are interested in joining the lab, please get in touch.

Sample Publications:

Dunham, Y., Chen, E., & Banaji, M.R. (in press).  Two signatures of implicit intergroup attitudes: Developmental invariance and early enculturation. Psychological Science.

Baron, A.S., Dunham, Y., Carey, S., & Banaji, M.R. (in press). Constraints on Category-based Inferences of Social Groups. Journal of Cognition and Development.

Dunham, Y., Baron, A.S., & Carey, S. (2011).  Consequences of ‘minimal’ group affiliations in children. Child Development 82(3), 793-811.

Dunham, Y. (2011). An angry = outgroup effect. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 47 (668-671).

Dunham, Y., Baron, A.S., & Banaji, M.R. (2008). The development of implicit intergroup cognition.  Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 12(7), 248-253.

 

photo M. Marsland, © 2011 Yale University
photo M. Marsland, © 2011 Yale University
photo M. Marsland, © 2011 Yale University
photo M. Marsland, © 2011 Yale University
photo M. Marsland, © 2011 Yale University
photo M. Marsland, © 2011 Yale University
photo M. Marsland, © 2011 Yale University
photo M. Marsland, © 2011 Yale University
photo M. Marsland, © 2011 Yale University
photo M. Marsland, © 2011 Yale University
photo M. Marsland, © 2011 Yale University
photo M. Marsland, © 2011 Yale University
photo M. Marsland, © 2011 Yale University
photo M. Marsland, © 2011 Yale University
photo M. Marsland, © 2011 Yale University
photo M. Marsland, © 2011 Yale University